Frequently Asked Questions
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Complaints

  1. Does the Board of Nursing investigate complaints against Nurse Aides?

  2. What kind of issues are not within the Board's jurisdiction?

  3. Does the Board accept anonymous complaints?

  4. Who are imposters?

  5. Will my identity be protected if I list myself as the complainant?

  6. What if a nurse is working in North Carolina on a multi-state license and needs to be reported?

  7. How do I find out the status of the complaint I filed?

  8. Is there a statute of limitations on the time between an incident and filing a complaint?

  9. What is the North Carolina Board of Nursing Complaint Evaluation Tool (CET)?

  10. Should I self-report criminal charges?

  11. Should I self-report a practice concern? 

  1. Does the Board of Nursing investigate complaints against Nurse Aides?

    No. To submit a complaint regarding a Nurse Aide I or Nurse Aide II you should contact the Health Care Personnel Registry Investigations Division at (919) 855-3968.

  2. What kind of issues are not within the Board's jurisdiction?

    Examples include but are not limited to: Employment issues (i.e., no call-no show, failure to complete work notice, co-worker disagreements, bedside manners, rudeness and personality conflicts, attendance issues, work hours); fee disputes/compensation claims.

  3. Does the Board accept anonymous complaints?

    Yes, anonymous complaints are accepted, however, we must still have the specifics of the complaint - "who, what, where, when, how & why." Not having a complainant name may hamper our ability to fully investigate the complaint. One of the main sources of information in an investigation is the complainant. Often the investigator needs to contact the complainant to clarify information, seek additional information or follow up on conflicting information.

  4. Who are imposters?

    Imposters are individuals who have represented themselves as nurses but have never held a license to practice nursing.

    90-171.43 License required.

    No person shall practice or offer to practice as a registered nurse or licensed practical nurse, or use the word "nurse" as a title for herself or himself, or use an abbreviation to indicate that the person is a registered nurse or licensed practice nurse, unless the person is currently licensed as a registered nurse or iicensed practical nurse as provided by this Article. If the word "nurse" is part of a longer title, such as "nurse's aide", a person who is entitled to use that title shal! use the entire title and may not abbreviate the title to "nurse".

  5. Will my identity be protected if I list myself as the complainant?

    The Board cannot guarantee your anonymity.

  6. What if a nurse is working in North Carolina on a multi-state license and needs to be reported?

    Any nurse working in North Carolina regardless if working on a North Carolina license or a multi-state license issued by a compact state, should be reported to the North Carolina Board of Nursing. North Carolina will conduct the investigation and communicate with the home state.

  7. How do I find out the status of the complaint I filed?

    All complainants who provide a valid name and address are notified of the final outcome of their complaint.

  8. Is there a statute of limitations on the time between an incident and filing a complaint?

    No. Each complaint upon receipt is reviewed regardless of when the incident occurred; however, it is always better if the report is made close to the time of the event. Locating witnesses and finding documents is more difficult as time passes thus impeding the effectiveness of the investigation.

  9. What is the North Carolina Board of Nursing Complaint Evaluation Tool (CET)?

    The North Carolina Board of Nursing Complaint Evaluation Tool (CET) is a tool developed by the Board of Nursing for nurse leaders and employers to identify and clarify when practice events are required to be reported to the Board. The CET provides a framework through which employers, nursing leaders, and the Board of Nursing can consistently and justly analyze and evaluate clinical practice events and errors. The CET guides the evaluation of whether the practice event/issue was a result of human error, at-risk behavior, or reckless behavior.

  10. Should I self-report criminal charges?

    Effective October 1, 2019 all licensees shall self-report to the Board any of the following within 30 days of their arrest or indictment.

    • Any felony arrest or indictment
    • Any arrest for driving while impaired or driving under the influence
    • Any arrest or indictment for the possession, use, or sale of any controlled substance
  11. Should I self-report a practice concern? 

    Although self-reporting exhibits ownership and responsibility for your actions, it is not required that you self-report a practice concern. To self-report, log onto your Nurse Gateway account.

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