Frequently Asked Questions
Printer-Friendly Version

Investigation & Resolution

  1. Will I be notified if a complaint has been file against me?

  2. How long will it take the Board of Nursing to conduct an investigation?

  3. Can a nurse under investigation work while the investigation is being conducted?

  4. Should an Attorney be retained?

  5. If I'm under investigation, will I get a chance to speak with an investigator?

  6. If I receive disciplinary action, will it be public information permanently?

  7. If I am being investigated, can I see the records and documents the Board has gathered in my case?

  8. If, while under investigation, I no longer wish to practice nursing, can I surrender my license?

  9. Can I appeal a Board's decision?

  1. Will I be notified if a complaint has been file against me?

    Complaints are reviewed for potential violations of the Nursing Practice Act. You will only be notified if a case is opened or if the Board needs additional clarification. In most cases, the nurse will be notified at the mailing address on file at the time an investigation has been opened. Additionally, all correspondence related to the investigation will be sent to the address on file; therefore, it is important to keep your address current in the Nurse Gateway.

  2. How long will it take the Board of Nursing to conduct an investigation?

    The process used to inquire or investigate an act on a complaint may vary depending upon the seriousness of the allegation(s) and the timeliness of the complaint. Investigations take time to complete. It may take a number of weeks to months depending on the complexity and seriousness of the alleged conduct, the ability to locate witnesses, and the response time for record requests.

  3. Can a nurse under investigation work while the investigation is being conducted?

    Yes. The nurse continues to hold an active license to practice until final action is taken.

  4. Should an Attorney be retained?

    The nurse has the right to hire an attorney during any phase of the investigation. If the nurse elects to retain an attorney, the nurse will be responsible for ensuring that their attorney provides the Investigator with a Letter of Representation on company letterhead. At the time the Letter of Representation is received, the communication will be between the Board and the attorney.

  5. If I'm under investigation, will I get a chance to speak with an investigator?

    A nurse is afforded the opportunity to respond to the allegations made against him or her and to offer evidence to be considered to show compliance with the Nursing Practice Act. A nurse may provide this information by participating in an interview and may also be asked to submit a written statement.

  6. If I receive disciplinary action, will it be public information permanently?

    Yes. All disciplinary action taken by the Board is public information in accordance with the Public Information Act - GS 132-1. Discipline posted against a nurse's license is not removed. If a licensee receives a non-published consent order or a private Letter of Concern, these are typically not published to the website but would be disclosed.

  7. If I am being investigated, can I see the records and documents the Board has gathered in my case?

    If a nurse wishes to review the documents collected as evidence, he or she may review these documents at the Board office during the licensee's scheduled interview. These documents will not be copied or made available unless the matter becomes a contested case.

  8. If, while under investigation, I no longer wish to practice nursing, can I surrender my license?

    In some cases, the nurse may have the opportunity to surrender his or her licensee. The licensee should discuss with the investigator if their case qualifies.

  9. Can I appeal a Board's decision?

    Yes. The nurse may be eligible to meet with the Board for either a Settlement Committee meeting or request the matter to be referred for an Administrative Hearing. Appeals to Administrative decisions are heard in Superior Court in the county of the residence of the licensee or in Wake County.

North Carolina Board of Nursing

Protect the public by regulating the practice of nursing.
Sitemap

Copyright © 2020
North Carolina Board of Nursing
All rights reserved

Terms of Service Privacy Policy

Contact Information

(919) 782-3211
(919) 781-9461
8 a.m.-5 p.m., Mon-Fri
North Carolina Board of Nursing