Nurse Gateway
News & Announcements
  • Safe Opioid Prescribing Resources

    External Resources on Opioid Safety/Substance Use Disorder

    Educational opportunities for meeting the requirements to apply for a medication-assisted therapy waiver

  • 10/25 Press Release: Enhanced Nurse Licensure Compact
    Posted: 10/25/2017

    North Carolina Board of Nursing


    4516 Lake Boone Trail ~ Raleigh, NC ~ 27607

  • 10/10 Press Release: Notice of Public Hearing Teleconference
    Posted: 10/10/2017

    North Carolina Board of Nursing


    4516 Lake Boone Trail ~ Raleigh, NC ~ 27607

    The Interstate Commission of Nurse Licensure Compact Administrators (ICNLCA) will hold a hearing on proposed rules via teleconference at 3:00 p.m. EST on December 8, 2017.

    Interested persons may electronically submit written comments  regarding proposed rules or amendments by selecting a proposed rule.

    If electronic submission is not possible, verbal comments will be permitted at the public hearing referenced above. Teleconference participant information is available at eNLC Rules.

  • 10/4 Press Release: Board of Nursing Proposed Rule Amendments
    Posted: 10/04/2017 

    North Carolina Board of Nursing


    4516 Lake Boone Trail ~ Raleigh, NC ~ 27607

    Proposed Rule Adoption

    Update! The Board of Nursing approved proposed amendments to 21 NCAC 36 .0815 Reporting Criteria on September 22, 2017 and directed staff to proceed with the rulemaking process.

    Reporting Criteria

    Reason for Proposed Amendment: Amendments to this Rule will increase the number of prescribers included in the Department of Health and Human Services report as well as provide uniform reporting criteria for Nurse Practitioners who prescribe controlled substances.

  • 10/3 Press Release: NCBON Launches New Website
    Posted: 10/03/2017

    North Carolina Board of Nursing


    4516 Lake Boone Trail ~ Raleigh, NC ~ 27607

    The North Carolina Board of Nursing (NCBON) has launched a completely redesigned website, NCBON.com, this Summer. The new website features enhanced navigation and a user-friendly content structure - designed to improve the quality of visitor interactions, creating a more meaningful and valuable user-experience.

    With more than 1.1 million visits and 4.2 million pageviews annually on NCBON.com, we concentrated on understanding visitor behavior through observation, analytics and feedback methodologies. Focused attention was given to how our content was organized, structured and labeled. We anticipated what visitors might need to do while on NCBON.com and ensured that the interface had elements that were easy to access, understand and use to facilitate those actions.

    What you'll love about the new website:
    • Homepage - at a glance, view Upcoming Events, Recent News and Licensure Statistics; Access the Nurse Gateway and quick links to get you where you want to go with 1-click
    • Department Overview Pages - provides a gateway to our content by giving users a quick-guide around the available content on a specific subject, featured topic or publication
    • Topics of Interest - each diverse group (Nurses, Nursing Students, Program Directors and consumers) will have their own unique section of the website that offers resources, materials and serves as a gateway to additional content
    • Widgets - access to Google translate, AccuWeather and the "I want to..." dropdown which contains quick-links to NCBON services and solutions

    We hope you find the new website refreshing and modern, user-friendly with easy access to pertinent information. We will continuously expand our online content to bring you updated and relevant information. Thank you for your valued feedback and suggestions - your input was incredibly useful in helping us make a better website. We carefully reviewed all.

  • 9/22 Press Release: Enhanced Nurse Licensure Compact
    Posted: 9/22/2017

    North Carolina Board of Nursing


    4516 Lake Boone Trail ~ Raleigh, NC ~ 27607

    Dear Nurse,

    As you may be aware, North Carolina has passed a law to allow it to become a member of the enhanced Nurse Licensure Compact (eNLC). The eNLC will be implemented in North Carolina on January 19, 2018. Please take a moment to read the information below about the eNLC and how it may affect your license.

    • The enhanced Nurse Licensure Compact (eNLC) is very similar to the original Nurse Licensure Compact (NLC) our state belongs to.
    • States that are members of the eNLC will issue multistate licenses that allow you to practice physically, electronically and/or telephonically across a state border to patients located in other states that are members of the eNLC.
    • If you hold a current North Carolina multistate license, issued on or before July 20, 2017, you will be grandfathered into the eNLC and no further action is needed from you unless you move to another state.
    • As with the original NLC, if you practice in other states on your multistate license, you must adhere to the laws and regulations of the state where the patient is located.
    Here are some important changes we want you to know about:
    • The eNLC has specific licensure requirements, these are called "Uniform Licensure Requirements (ULRs)." As stated above, all nurses previously declaring North Carolina their home state and holding a multistate license will be grandfathered into the eNLC; however, if you move to another state that is a member of the eNLC, you will need to meet the ULRs in order to obtain a multistate license. Likewise, all nurses applying for licensure and declaring North Carolina their home sate will need to meet the ULRs.
    • The states that are part of the eNLC are not exactly the same as the original NLC. If you have an eNLC multistate license, you can only practice in those designated eNLC states (see https://ncsbn.org/enlc for an updated map).
    • If you need to practice in a state that is not a member of the eNLC, you need a single state license issued from that state regardless of whether you hold a multistate license.
    If you need more information:
    • The National Council of State Boards of Nursing has a website (https://ncsbn.org/enlc) that will provide you with the details you need to know about this new and exciting change for licensure in your state.
    • On the website, there are numerous resources available for your use, including written information, videos and infographics.
    • The website will also lead you to our state board of nursing website that has state-specific information on it.
  • 8/28 Press Release: Enhanced Nurse Licensure Compact
    Posted: 8/28/2017

    North Carolina Board of Nursing


    4516 Lake Boone Trail ~ Raleigh, NC ~ 27607

    Enhanced Nurse Licensure Compact (eNLC) Interstate Commission Sets Jan. 19, 2018, as Implementation Date for eNLC

    On July 24, 2017, the State of North Carolina changed the way it regulates the Multistate Licensure Privilege consistent with the enhanced Nurse Licensure Compact (eNLC) recently enacted and signed by Governor Roy Cooper. Although quite similar, the new eNLC was designed to effectively repeal and replace the existing Nurse Licensure Compact (NLC), originally adopted in 1999.

    If licensed in North Carolina, a nurse may practice nursing consistent with the scope and duties of that license in this State. However, the new eNLC will affect some nurses’ ability to utilize a multistate licensure privilege currently available under the old compact (NLC). This notice is posted to provide information concerning some of the most important changes.

    Beginning January 19, 2018, the eNLC will supersede the NLC adopted in 1999. Although most of the prior NLC states have adopted the new eNLC, beginning January 19, 2018, a nurse in North Carolina will not have a multistate licensure privilege in those states which have not yet enacted the eNLC. These states include: Colorado, New Mexico, Rhode Island and Wisconsin. These states may join the eNLC at some time in future.

    Beginning January 19,2018, a North Carolina licensee who holds an unencumbered multistate license will have an unencumbered multistate licensure privilege in all those states which have adopted the eNLC. Those states include: Arizona, Arkansas, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Iowa, Kentucky, Maine, Maryland, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, New Hampshire, North Carolina, North Dakota, Oklahoma, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virginia, West Virginia, and Wyoming.

    If you are a North Carolina licensee who was issued a single state license, or if you have any stipulation on your license which limits your practice to North Carolina only, you will not be eligible for a multistate license or a multistate licensure privilege.

    An applicant for North Carolina licensure must meet all the Uniform Licensure Requirements (ULRs) in order to have a multistate licensure privilege. The ULRs may be found here: https://www.ncsbn.org/eNLC-ULRs_031717_FINAL.pdf

    The most significant effect relative to the ULRs is that any North Carolina applicant for licensure who has been convicted of a felony, or pled guilty to a felony, will not be eligible for a multistate license under the new Compact. If they are determined to be eligible for a license in North Carolina, they will receive a single state license to practice in North Carolina only. If a nurse wishes to practice in another compact state, that nurse will be required to apply to each state to determine whether they will be eligible for a single state license to practice there based on their felony history.

    Any current licensee who receives a felony conviction, or pleads guilty to a felony after the effective date of the new compact, July 20, 2017, if still eligible to retain their license in North Carolina, will lose the multistate licensure privilege and retain only a single state license going forward. Further, any current North Carolina licensee who has a past felony conviction or pleads guilty to a felony prior to the effective date of the new compact, if eligible to retain their license in North Carolina, will be eligible to maintain a multistate licensure privilege under the new compact.

    For more information on the new eNLC visit: https://www.ncsbn.org/enhanced-nlc-implementation.htm

  • 2017 Election Results

    Results of the 2017 Election of Nurse Members to the North Carolina Board of Nursing:

  • Summer 2017 Issue of the Nursing Bulletin

    Publication of the North Carolina State Board of Nursing. Volume 13; Edition 39

  • 7/21 Press Release: Enhanced Nurse Licensure Compact
    Posted: 7/21/2017

    North Carolina Board of Nursing


    4516 Lake Boone Trail ~ Raleigh, NC ~ 27607

    The signing of Nursing Licensure Compact legislation by Governor Roy Cooper on July 20, 2017 triggered the establishment of the enhanced Nurse Licensure Compact ( eNLC), ushering in a new era of nurse licensure in the United States. North Carolina is the 26th state to pass eNLC legislation and in the planning stages that was the critical number of states selected to implement the updated compact agreement.

    The original Nurse Licensure Compact was ratified in North Carolina in 1999.  The Compact gives nurses greater mobility when making career moves and eliminated the cost of holding multiple licenses for those nurses who chose to pursue employment in other states that are also members of the Nurse Licensure Compact. 

    “Boards of nursing were the first health care regulatory bodies to develop a model for interstate licensure,“ reported Julie George, Executive Director of the North Carolina Board of Nursing. “In establishing the new eNLC patient safety was of paramount importance.”

    Rep. John Szoka, of Fayetteville, championed this legislation in the North Carolina General Assembly. “This legislation is especially important in North Carolina because it allows service members and spouses who have a nursing license to more quickly enter the workforce,” said Rep. Szoka. “Also the eNLC establishes uniform licensure requirements with a higher threshold for issuing a license with a multistate privilege.” 

    To date, the North Carolina Board of Nursing has identified more than 17,600 nurses who have taken advantage of the old Compact and with the addition of more states joining the new eNLC this number is expected to grow substantially.

    Nursing board executives from the 26 states* that make up this new compact will form the eNLC Commission. The Commission’s first priority will be to adopt operational rules and set implementation dates. Once set, dates of implementation will be shared with licensed nurses and the public. More information about the eNLC will be posted on the NC Board of Nursing website in the coming weeks.

    eNCL states include: Arizona, Arkansas, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Iowa, Kentucky, Maine, Maryland, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, New Hampshire, North Carolina, North Dakota, Oklahoma, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virginia, West Virginia and Wyoming.

  • Policy for the use of Opiates
    Policy for the use of Opioids for the Treatment of Pain

    The North Carolina Board of Nursing (NCBON) believes that a fundamental component of holistic healthcare includes the appropriate evaluation and management of pain. Responsibly prescribed opioid medications may help licensees treat their patients’ pain safely and effectively while improving their quality of life. It is the duty of every licensee prescribing opioid medications to be knowledgeable of both the therapeutic benefits, risks, and potential harm associated with opioid treatment. The North Carolina Board of Nursing expects every licensee prescribing opioids for the treatment of pain to provide diagnoses, treatments, and health record documentation t consistent with the standard of care in North Carolina. The North Carolina Board of Nursing notes that a failure to provide opioid treatment consistent with the standard of care in North Carolina may subject a licensee to disciplinary action by the North Carolina Board of Nursing. 

    Section 12F.16.(a) of Session Law 2015-241 requires North Carolina Board of Dental Examiners, North Carolina Board of Nursing, North Carolina Board of Podiatry Examiners, North Carolina Division of Public Health, North Carolina Division of Medical Assistance, North Carolina Division of Mental Health, Developmental Disabilities, and Substance Abuse Services North Carolina Division of Public Safety (Medical, dental and mental health services)  to adopt the North Carolina Medical Board policy for the use of opioids for the treatment of pain by July 1, 2016. This decision was motivated in part by a 2014 report to the Joint Legislative Program Evaluation Oversight Committee. The report concluded that North Carolina needs to strengthen its monitoring and prevention of prescription opioid abuse and specifically noted that North Carolina prescribers lack clear, authoritative standards for treating pain with prescription opioid medications.


    The North Carolina Board of Nursing and other regulatory boards have previously attempted to provide guidance regarding opioid treatment of pain to its licensees through guidance documents generated and maintained by each Board. However, in order to provide its licensees with guidance that reflects the most current research and recommended practices, the North Carolina Board of Nursing has adopted and endorsed the CDC Guideline for Prescribing Opioids for Chronic Pain written and maintained by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (“CDC”). While these guidelines do not constitute regulations or necessarily state the standard of care in North Carolina in every context, the North Carolina Board of Nursing’s believes that these guidelines can provide useful information to licensees related to the appropriate considerations to be made prior to and during treatment plans involving opioids. 

    The CDC Guideline for Prescribing Opioids for Chronic Pain can be found at https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/65/rr/rr6501e1.htm In addition to its Guideline, the CDC has also provided a number of useful clinician resources related to opioid treatment of pain covering topics such as Nonopioid Treatments, Assessing Benefits and Harms, Calculating Dosage, and Tapering. These documents can be found at the following link: https://www.cdc.gov/drugoverdose/prescribing/resources.html 


    It is the North Carolina Board of Nursing's hope that familiarity with the concepts included in the documents above will help licensees provide safe and effective care for their North Carolina patients.

     
    Adopted: Sep 1996; Amended: April, 2017

  • Reporting Rule

    Controlled Substance Reporting Rule: Implications for Advanced Practice Nurse Prescribers

  • New Position Statements
  • Clinical Nurse Specialist Requirement

    Effective July 1, 2015, the new Clinical Nurse Specialist Rules (21 NCAC 36.0228) require all Clinical Nurse Specialists to be recognized by the North Carolina Board of Nursing in order to practice as a Clinical Nurse Specialist in North Carolina.

    Clinical Nurse Specialist Rules and Recognition Process
  • Abandonment, Neglect and Ebola

    Abandonment, Neglect and Ebola

    Nurses are questioning if the North Carolina Board of Nursing (NCBON) considers refusal to accept an assignment to care for a client with Ebola Hemorrhagic Fever to be abandonment or neglect.

    • Refusal of an assignment is not considered abandonment, nor neglect. 
    • Licensed nurses are legally mandated to accept only assignments within scope of practice and for which they:
      • are qualified and competent,
      • have adequate resources available, and
      • function within policies and procedures supportive of safe care and the prevailing standards of care.
    • Employer policies addressing refusal of assignment guide management responses and are beyond North Carolina Board of Nursing jurisdiction.

    Refer to North Carolina Board of Nursing Position Statements on Accepting Assignments and Staffing and Patient Safety (which explains Abandonment): 

    Refer to the North Carolina Division of Public Health for specific information on Ebola Hemorrhagic Fever.

  • Delegation of Medication Administration to Unlicensed Assistive Personnel

    The North Carolina Board of Nursing (NCBON) has clarified that North Carolina nursing laws and rules permit the Registered Nurse (RN) and Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN) to delegate the  technical task of medication administration to the Unlicensed Assistive Personnel (UAP).

  • Advanced Practice Registered Nurses, Registered Nurses and Licensed Practical Nurses: New North Carolina Medical Board Policy on the Use of Opioid Medication for the Treatment of Pain

    At the North Carolina Medical Board's May 2014 meeting, a new Policy on the use of Opioid Medications for the Treatment of Pain was adopted. The effective date is June 1, 2014. The policy provides guidelines and information regarding the expectations for patient management.

  • First in Nursing, A Journey of Regulatory Excellence

    First in Nursing, A Journey of Regulatory Excellence: The North Carolina Board of Nursing 1903-2013 is a book about the history of the Board of Nursing, by Shirley P. Toney, RN, Ph.D.

  • Nurse Practitioner Rule Changes
    Refresher Course Requirement and Prescribing Rule

    Refresher Course Requirement

    Effective January 1, 2013, the time out of practice before a Nurse Practitioner is required to complete a refresher course will decrease from 5 years to 2 years. Therefore, effective January 1, 2013, Nurse Practitioners who have been out of practice for greater than two years will be required to complete the Board approved Nurse Practitioner refresher course before they can be approved to practice.

    Nurse Practitioner Refresher Course Proposed Rule and Requirements

    Prescribing Rule (New Nurse Practitioner Rule Effective December 1, 2012)

    Effective December 1, 2012, Nurse Practitioners shall not prescribe controlled substances, as defined by the State and Federal Controlled Substances Acts, for the Nurse Practitioner's own use or that of a Nurse Practitioner's Supervising Physician; or that of a member of the Nurse Practitioner's immediate family, which shall mean a spouse, parent, child, sibling, parent-in-law, son or daughter-in-law, brother or sister-in-law, step-parent, step-child, step-siblings, or any other person living in the same residence as the licensee; or anyone with whom the Nurse Practitioner is having a sexual relationship or has a significant emotional relationship.

    Prescribing Rule

  • Nurse Practitioner Position Statement

    New Position Statement on Nurse Practitioners and Board Certification approved by Joint Subcommittee.

  • Advanced Practice Registered Nurse Advisory Committee Final Report to Board

    The Advanced Practice Registered Nurse Advisory Committee presented the final report to the Board at the September 2011 Board meeting.

North Carolina Board of Nursing

The mission of the North Carolina Board of Nursing is to protect the public by regulating the practice of nursing.
Sitemap

Copyright © 2017
North Carolina Board of Nursing
All rights reserved

Terms of Service Privacy Policy

Contact Information

(919) 782-3211
(919) 781-9461
8 a.m.-5 p.m., Mon-Fri
North Carolina Board of Nursing